Emily on the beach, standing on their right leg, with their left leg raised in front of them. Her right arm is bent at the elbow and near their face, while their left arm is extended to the side.
Emily on the beach, standing on their right leg, with their left leg raised in front of them. Her right arm is bent at the elbow and near their face, while their left arm is extended to the side.
Moving Bodies of Water

This workshop is being offered to help introduce the theme of water with choreography and dance, and to provide inspiration for the 17 Vermont choreographers who are participating in Traces 2021. 

 

The workshop opens with a movement class inviting deep embodiment of the qualities and cycles of water on earth. Then you will be guided through sensory stories of encounters with local water bodies and opportunities to help protect water health. You will expand awareness of your somatic/emotional response to the health of our watershed. You will be invited to dance responses to the material presented. From this sharing, gestures might arise that may inspire choreographed work or collective dance. We pose the questions: How can dance be a form of environmental activism? Are both movement and water access a birthright? 

Accessible to all bodies; no dance experience necessary. Wear comfortable clothing. You may want to take notes. 

 

Thursday May 6th

7:30-8:45pm

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89516814986?pwd=eEtDRlN4bmg3bE8vTWJGVWlQaFpOZz09

Password: waterdance

 

Facilitators:

Jess Rubin listens to and reads surrounding landscapes. While gardening and wilderness guiding, Jess earned herbalism, nature awareness, outdoor education, & permaculture certificates, a BA from Cornell University in Ecological Literature with Native American Studies minor, & an MS in Environmental Studies with VT middle & high school science teaching licenses from Antioch NE. She has served as a nature mentor, outdoor educator, conservation crew leader, corridor monitor, public school science teacher, environmental studies college adjunct, and university guest lecturer. She facilitates local business, MycoEvolve, which through earthworks, education and research offers ecological resilience services. While she attempts to revitalize degraded and recovering ecosystems, she serves as a researcher in UVM's Plant Soil Science Department aiming for a Masters degree in Ecological Landscape Design. As a Kohenet and lifelong dancer, she is grateful to participate in this event that focuses on watershed health, a cause dear to her heart.

Emily Arwen Mott’s goal for herself and others is to connect to joyful experience and authentic expression. She believes that deep listening— when we are dancing, making music, communicating with animals, or contacting another body—opens the wellspring. Emily has a long-time studio of piano students, a massage practice, an active schedule of movement classes and an ongoing involvement in equine therapy. She comes from a loving family of musicians and is a fourth-generation Noyes Rhythm (nature-based somatic dance) teacher. [Noyes Rhythm Movement/Dance Teacher, 20 years certified, Program Director for the Noyes School; Certified Massage Therapist —1500 hours cumulative training hours—Swedish, Deep Tissue, Myofascial, Shiatsu, Thai, Reiki, Dance Injury; Therapeutic Riding Instructor, Certified PATH-INTL, 14 years; Music Instruction: certifications in piano pedagogy from Bryanskaya Institute and Suzuki School with ongoing trainings, certified in Jacques-Dalcroze method and Music Together early childhood music.]

Participating Artists
When
-
WHERE
Online via Zoom
COST
Free, Donations greatly appreciated